3rd XI defeat Stanmore

Victory by 8 wickets after last’s week comprehensive defeat by a similar margin fully justified Adrian Carr’s decision to insert Stanmore. His reasons? Something to do with the pitch, conditions and “oh we don’t have any bowling,” he said. Such strategic genius yielded stunning immediate results. Stanmore were soon down to 40 for 4, and looked like being skittled for 80 plus in less than 20 overs.

The first wicket came in the first over. Pity their left handed opener who received two short balls down leg which he put away for 4, and 3, and then received a wide outside off stump, followed a by a late in-swinger from middle to off which he edged to the keeper. Abhishek had found his line. He then bowled a controlled spell; rolling his big shoulders and tall frame to tie their batsmen down with heavy balls and, late in-swing.  He took 2 for 35 from 11.

At the other end our other non bowler, Harrison “I shagged your wife Babs” Folland was, as they say,  cleaning up. His 5 for 63 from one 23 over spell involved two caught and bowled’s, one LBW, and the ball of the day; a lovely thing that pitched middle, took an edge, hit top of off and was caught by Will Dean at first slip.

All action Folland was backed by Carr, who bowled a ball that produced the worst dropped catch in the history of adult cricket according to Jeremy Dangerfield. No excuses were accepted. The wailing psycho who crossed the catcher’s line of vision and screached like a footman schtupping a parlour maid just as the ball met hand was given short shriff- rightly so. Carr took 2 wickets and was denied a third, so all was ok in the end.

The chase had many good contributions including Declan’s 41no but Christian McLoughlin’s stood out.  Lusty on side wacking, slog sweeps with front-foot cleared, and the shot of the day, a dance down the wicket to loft the off spinner over mid off were promising signs of a maturing young batsman.

3rd XI Report

Possibly the strangest game I’ve ever played in.

Ourselves as top of league playing the Bush as third but having noted that second placed Twickenham thrashed the Bush last week and two weeks ago we had murdered ( for 5 points ) Twickenham. So who would you have put your money on ?

Anyway after establishing which of the 4 pitches on the large expanse that was formerly The Civil Service Sports Club we were playing on we lost the toss and were inserted. But we didn’t care, we’ve batted first all year and if we haven’t won we’ve always secured the winning draw.

We were greeted by two fastish bowlers on a helpful if fairly true pitch: that is apart from James who received an unplayable delivery second ball and so had all afternoon to wonder what might have happened if he’d made the ( even longer ) trip to Barnes.

Thereafter we proceeded at a reasonable rate for 30 overs without anyone really breaking free. The only person who threatened to do so was Ali Lynch for 2 or 3 overs after what might best be termed a “diplomatic incident”.

What kept us in check were the Bush’s quartet of fastish ( they were fast enough for this pitch ) bowlers who all hit the deck hard just short of a driving length. However when Deano & Harrison fell in quick succession to leave us 138/5 and with no sign of any easing up in the bowling, 170/180 all out was a very real possibility.

What prevented this was Babs Oduwole who had arrived on the ground just in time to bat at 7 and who proved to be a solid partner for Jeremy right through till the 46th over. Jeremy, continuing his rich vein of form, compiled a fine 59 and with lower middle contributions from Babs ( 13 ), Ricky Uppal (18 ) and Carr ( 12 – maintaining his season’s strike rate of 125 ) we were able to reach 237 in 55 overs.

We were more than happy with this, we thought we would probably win or at least secure the winning draw and if things went disastrously wrong the worse outcome would surely be 4 points for the Bush and 2 for ourselves: looking at the season’s results so far it seemed inconceivable they would get 238 in 45 overs.

After tea however things took a drastic turn for the worse. The only positive was James’ brilliant run out of one of the Bush’s openers but after that every bowler was hit for at least 7 an over. The pitch did not turn, did not seam and the ball did not swing. Unlike the Bush’s four seamers none of our bowlers were fast enough to use the potentially helpful pitch. The only token victory achieved was in slightly reducing the other opener’s average from 96 by dismissing him late on for a mere 85.

So although we had batted the full 55 overs, the 238 was knocked off with 15 overs to spare – good job I’m not a betting man !!

Adrian Carr

2nd XI v Barnes – Match Report

Southgate 2nd XI 174 all out
Barnes 2nd XI 175-7

Barnes won by 3 wickets

On Saturday the 2nd XI travelled to Barnes for the first time in 6 years. My walk from the station took me through a charming village fete so I can confirm it is every bit the epitome of middle class England that it was on our last visit. 

Sam lost the toss and we were inserted on a hard wicket with a green tinge. M Joseph (16) and W Khan (35) opened up and with a combination of watchfulness and calculated stroke play reached 53 without loss after 13 overs. However, when they fell in quick succession alongside J Jouning’s dubious caught behind decision, the game quickly turned and we found ourselves on 54-3. R Johnson (10) and S Zulfiqar (37) set about rebuilding and took the total past the hundred mark before 2 more wickets in quick succession left us at 106-5. Ellis (31), Bellwood (11), Mullazadah (11) and Faruqi (12) all batted well, but we paid the price for too many batsmen failing to capitalise on starts and were bowled out for 174 in 45.3 overs. 

It’s worth noting that throughout the innings Barnes used the same bowler from one end; their overseas player Sullivan bowled 22.3 overs of seam off the reel. Given the hot and sunny conditions this was an admirable display, but when we were informed that he had completed a course of chemotherapy in 2015 we had a new level of appreciation for his efforts. 

Tea was a superb spread. A pesto and sun dried tomato pasta accompanied a range of French bread sandwiches with plentiful good quality filling. There was also a comprehensive sweet selection courtesy of messrs Kipling, Marks & Spencer. 

We waddled out to field knowing that we would require a special bowling performance. Barnes’ ground is not particularly large and the outfield proved very fast so 220 was what we had wanted at the start of the day.

We got off to the perfect start when Farhad Mullazadah (17-3-55-3) steamed in and castled one of their openers in the first over. He was ably supported by Flint (9.5-1-43-1) and some good catching as we took wickets regularly, and Barnes were 5 down before they were halfway to our total. R Desai (13-4-60-2) and S Faruqi (6-2-14-1) bowled well in tandem (the latter probably under bowling himself) but some effective counter attacking batting from Barnes’ mid-to-lower order moved them closer to their target. 

Farhad came back on and showed good stamina to maintain his pace, but an obdurate innings from Barnes’ number 6 Wellesley – who we later found out appears in the line of Royal succession (only at Barnes!) saw them home. Initially it appeared as though his family connections were perhaps the reason for his selection; Farhad repeatedly passed his outside edge and Ravi and Sam bowled dot after dot. However he persisted doggedly and his unbeaten 20 off plenty was exactly what Barnes needed to get over the line. 

It was a spirited performance with the ball and in the field, but underperforming with the bat ultimately cost us. Had we added an extra 30 runs, or even used up more overs, we may have been able to force a victory.

 
Max Joseph

2nd XI v Barnes Report

Southgate 2nd XI 174 all out
Barnes 2nd XI 175-7

Barnes won by 3 wickets

On Saturday the 2nd XI travelled to Barnes for the first time in 6 years. My walk from the station took me through a charming village fete so I can confirm it is every bit the epitome of middle class England that it was on our last visit. 

Sam lost the toss and we were inserted on a hard wicket with a green tinge. M Joseph (16) and W Kahn (35) opened up and with a combination of watchfulness and calculated stroke play reached 53 without loss after 13 overs. However, when they fell in quick succession alongside J Jouning’s dubious caught behind decision, the game quickly turned and we found ourselves on 54-3. R Johnson (10) and S Zulfiqar (37) set about rebuilding and took the total past the hundred mark before 2 more wickets in quick succession left us at 106-5. Ellis (31), Bellwood (11), Mullazadah (11) and Faruqi (12) all batted well, but we paid the price for too many batsmen failing to capitalise on starts and were bowled out for 174 in 45.3 overs. 

It’s worth noting that throughout the innings Barnes used the same bowler from one end; their overseas player Sullivan bowled 22.3 overs of seam off the reel. Given the hot and sunny conditions this was an admirable display, but when we were informed that he had completed a course of chemotherapy in 2015 we had a new level of appreciation for his efforts. 

Tea was a superb spread. A pesto and sun dried tomato pasta accompanied a range of French bread sandwiches with plentiful good quality filling. There was also a comprehensive sweet selection courtesy of messrs Kipling, Marks & Spencer. 

We waddled out to field knowing that we would require a special bowling performance. Barnes’ ground is not particularly large and the outfield proved very fast so 220 was what we had wanted at the start of the day.

We got off to the perfect start when Farhad Mullazadah (17-3-55-3) steamed in and castled one of their openers in the first over. He was ably supported by Flint (9.5-1-43-1) and some good catching as we took wickets regularly, and Barnes were 5 down before they were halfway to our total. R Desai (13-4-60-2) and S Faruqi (6-2-14-1) bowled well in tandem (the latter probably under bowling himself) but some effective counter attacking batting from Barnes’ mid-to-lower order moved them closer to their target. 

Farhad came back on and showed good stamina to maintain his pace, but an obdurate innings from Barnes’ number 6 Wellesley – who we later found out appears in the line of Royal succession (only at Barnes!) saw them home. Initially it appeared as though his family connections were perhaps the reason for his selection; Farhad repeatedly passed his outside edge and Ravi and Sam bowled dot after dot. However he persisted doggedly and his unbeaten 20 off plenty was exactly what Barnes needed to get over the line. 

It was a spirited performance with the ball and in the field, but underperforming with the bat ultimately cost us. Had we added an extra 30 runs, or even used up more overs, we may have been able to force a victory.

 
Max Joseph

1st XI Report v Brondesbury

Brondesbury CC   247-8 (64overs)  Southgate CC   221-9 (56 overs)

Southgate gained a much needed and hard earned 4 points from their important bottom of the table clash at the sweltering Walker Ground on Saturday in a match which to be honest, showed why both teams are battling it out at the foot of the Middlesex League Premier Division.

In view of recent batting collapses It was good news that Southgate were able to field first and they  made a great start as excellent bowling by Rashid and Keaton Critchell saw the visitors in some trouble at 16-3 after7.1 overs. Brondesbury’s prolific batsman James  Overy, scorer of over 500 runs already in the league this season fell lbw to Rashid.

Michael Stevens took over from Critchell and soon induced a snick from Ward and Alvin leapt and swooped as in days of yore to grab a brilliant high catch at slip for the fourth wicket. Just before lunch Mikey struck again when Bron’s  dangerous overseas player Allen was  lbw.

Rashid bowled steadily throughout the morning and with Bron 88-5 at lunch hopes were high.

Someone commented that this was more like a Southgate lunch score !

Soon after lunch Mikey picked up another wicket and at this stage with Bron at 104-6 there was only one winner.

Or was there !

Now was the time for Ashley Sivarajah , our talented left arm spinner to enter the fray and finish off the visitors to open the door for a home victory. Unfortunately Ashley was on MCC duty at Lord’s in the Test Match, selling clothes in the shop but surely as a professional cricketer it would have been better for him to be actually playing cricket rather than selling the sports’ accoutrements !

With Mukesh Bhatt also unavailable the Southgate attack was lacking a spin option and was thus rather one paced although Ben Elders bowled a steady spell down the hill in only his second 1st XI league match and Marcello de Crescendo on debut bowled his off spin with good flight but not such good direction. However,  Marchy made a good impression with his fielding and his general enthusiasm and at his present rate of improvement is definitely one for the future. His three overs were the only respite from seam throughout the innings.

 The Bron number 6, Bethel went on to  score 95 * and with the help of each member of the late middle order enabled his team to finally declare, after 64 overs, at 247-7 as the Southgate bowlers tired in the afternoon heat.

One highlight, unfortunately with no positive outcome, was a magnificent, wide, half volley stumping attempt on the leg side by Phil Dunnett off Rashid, which impressed some former wicketkeepers in the pavilion, but for some reason not the square leg umpire.

(A personal note here as I have a  great obsession about the use of a third man to medium and faster bowlers at all levels, from Test matches down, at all times, especially in good, dry conditions. The lack of one in this instance probably cost upwards of 30 runs which may have been the difference to the end result. Captain Phil shares the view of most Test and County captains by not employing one so it must be me that’s wrong !)

Southgate started well with yet another new opening partnership of Alvin and Luke Hutton, the latter having surviving Glastonbury and looking in good form.

The Bron opening bowler was captain Adam Wilson, who took all ten wickets in the previous league match. Alvin (24) and Luke (20) started well before they were both out within a few minutes of each other. Once again Mike Stevens (25) made a start but was very unluckily caught down the leg side off a terrible ball from the off spinner. Critchell came and went and at 88-4 there was a familiar feel to the Southgate batting.

There followed a rather strange, in the circumstances, partnership between Tom Edrich and Fred Wilson . Needing to score at 4.5 runs per over to win the match they added just 38 in 18 overs before Fred was out, leaving the remaining batsmen a mammoth task. Perhaps a little more urgency in running between the wickets would have helped.

Arnie  Sahota ( 41) arrived and changed the picture for a while but it was all too late and although Rashid (15) raised hopes again the winning chance had disappeared.

Tom Edrich battled through and finished on 55* from 118 balls. A difficult innings for him, having to overcome his recent poor form whilst still being aware of the target ahead. He was, in the end, the perfect person to block the last two balls to save the game for his team.

A game that Southgate should definitely have won and again the lack of a big innings by just one batsman was the problem.

Peter Jouning

The Bugle – Week 9

Trees uproot House to advance to semi final of Middlesex cup

Wycombe House rolled for 51 at the Walker Ground on Sunday

2nd XI bring back 10 points from Hornsey

3rd XI dominate in their win at MTSSC

4s come up short at home to Old Actonians

Southgate under 21s  conceded their away fixture on Sunday, giving over 10 points to Stoke ‘Stokey Bears’ Newington under 21s.

Editor’s mid season memo

     Sitting in my Thai hostel with terrible WiFi (the things I do for this club),  it felt like just yesterday we were walking out for the preseason friendlies, and in a flash we find ourselves now half way through another cricket season. This season was to be our most interesting, new divisions and challenges awaited 3 of our sides. Youth and experience would have to find a new balance at the club, all the way from the top down.

        So far, our 2nd and 3rd teams have taken to highers standards like ducks to water. The strength of the club has been emphasised in certain areas so prominently that domination with the bat for these sides has become routine on Saturdays. Our 4th team have found their new division a little more challenging, however they still sit in a respectable mid table. Old and new players have mixed well to produce an enjoyable playing environment, with a sprinkling of youth being given the opportunity to make their mark at the club.

        The struggles of the 1st team have been well documented across the club so there is no need to highlight it further. The incredible nature of cricket is such that balls finding the boundary in previous seasons are now hitting fielders. Balls are missing edges and edges are missing hands. The cycles of form and confidence are unlike in any other sport, and this is what gives our game both its beauty and its brutality.

        The second half of this season brings hope however, for individuals and for teams. A chance to reset and reassess. A final push to turn 3rd place into promotion, 2nd into a league title or relegation into survival. A few have lacked the appetite for it, but in the spaces left behind lies opportunity for those eager to take the chances that will come their way. Whether it will be the fearlessness of our younger players to take on bigger challenges, or our more experienced players willing to lead the way remains to be seen – but it is certain that club heroes can be born. It will be vitally important to stand by our teammates and captains in the telling weeks to come, both on and off the field.

——————————————————————————

Southgate 1st XI      | 145 all out [60.2] |

Hampstead 1st XI   | 146-4 [43]              |

 

Hampstead won by 6 wickets.

 

Southgate’s batting woes, sadly, continue. Another catastrophic batting collapse saw the team suffer their seventh Premier League defeat of the season, this time losing by 6 wickets to visiting Hampstead.

 

Captain Phil Dunnett needed to win the toss for two reasons. Firstly, he needed to bat second to give his batsmen a psychological advantage knowing that both of the team’s previous victories this season had been batting second. Secondly, the wicket was a little damp and had a very green appearance. Needless to say the visiting captain called correctly and asked Southgate to bat. It was not easy.

 

There was a lot of movement off the pitch and a considerable amount of playing and missing by the Southgate batsmen, especially against Steve Clark , bowling an excellent 4th stump line, and eventually finishing with figures of 4-35 in 21 overs.

 

The morning session saw the home team finish on 67-2 off 32 overs. This included one over from the first replacement seamer which went for 12! A difficult morning but with Michael Stevens (36) and Tom Edrich (11) battling through until lunch there was still hope of a reasonable score.

 

However, immediately after the break both were out in identical fashion, each inexplicably missing a straight ball from the Hampstead 4th seamer.

 

Michael was again the team’s best performer but once again was unable to continue and build a real innings of substance. Ayush Sahota (33) and Fred Wilson (20*) gave further hope and the former showed his usual flair for a while and with the score at 110-4 once again there was some optimism of a good, working total.

 

Unfortunately Sahota was stumped off a new spinner and the tail, this time, collapsed alarmingly around Fred, with some very poor batting which saw the last six wickets fall for just 20  runs.

 

Southgate needed a good start and in fact, couldn’t have had a better one, as Rashid produced the perfect yorker with the first ball of the Hampstead innings.

 

The Southgate bowlers toiled away on an improving pitch but Hampstead were under no real pressure in chasing such a low score. Two brilliant catches, one by Sahota and one by Stevens and a successful lbw appeal by Sivararajah gave the home side a smidgeon of hope at  104 -4 and the fielding intensity and concentration increased accordingly but Hampstead finally strolled to their meagre target, winning with 17 overs to spare.

 

Peter Jouning

 

Hornsey 2nd XI    | 122 all out [43.2] | MDC 5-37 (9) | Elders 2-21 (11) | Flint 2-

Southgate 2nd XI | 126-8 [39.4]          | Johnson 35*  | Elders 4*(1)

 

Southgate win by 2 wickets – 10 points.

Southgate bowled well, both teams batted badly with Rob Johnson batting very maturely to guide the side home. This is all I can write with the limitations of being on the other side of the world, apologies.

 

Southgate 3rd XI  | 201 all out [54]  |

MTSSC 3rd XI       | 130 all out [26]  | Cox 6-

 

Southgate win by 71 runs – 12 points.

 

Southgate went away to Middlesex Tamils sitting pretty on top of the table, looking to further our lead. Buoyed by Sage’s team talk telling us we “only had one decent player today” (Harrison) openers Ali Lynch and RBL went to the crease after we had been stuck in on a green one.

We got off to a quick start with 16 coming off the first over. However, some questionable umpiring had RBL given out LBW for one and Ali Lynch (11) judged to have hit one, which he was sure he hadn’t. It was down to Hughes and Folland to steady the ship. Folland was living up to Sage’s earlier appraisal, playing some lovely shots on his way to 25 before being bowled by one that kept low. Hughes played a gritty and much needed innings of 30 off 70 balls, giving us the platform that we needed on a pitch that was doing all sorts!

Some very useful contributions from the middle order, namely Michael Cox (25) Ricky (14) and Babs (21) had us past the 150 mark. Then a decent total was made a good one by Ankit (14 not out) and some inspired late hitting from Sage including a wonderful straight six gave us 201 all out off 54 overs.

 

We came out confident that a few early wickets would put us well on our way to 10 points. Thompson and Uppal opened up with Thompson bowling 3 erratic overs, letting the Tamil’s top order off the hook. However, Uppal at the other end gave us the early wicket we needed in his first over. He picked up two more vital wickets in his eight overs, putting us right on the front foot. Enter Michael Cox. On a bad day otherwise for Kiwi’s he came on and bowled 10 brilliant overs that ultimately  won us the game. He got 6-56 off 10 overs, with five of his wickets being clean bowled, showing Ricky that you could turn the ball on this track!

Harrison finished the game off, much to Sage’s delight bowling out their number 11, leaving the Tammil’s all out for 130 and giving the Southgate boys a well deserved 10 points and flying at top of the league after half the games have been played.

 

Henry Thompson

 

Southgate 4th XI          | 164 all out [49]  |

Old Actonians 4th XI  | 168-7 [33]            | Madhavan 5-38 |

 

Old Actonians win by 3 wickets.

 

The 4s re-established part of its raison d’etre with three 15 year olds bolstering the side (I have been trying very hard to get youngsters into the team since the start of the season, but young people today seem to take their exams much more seriously than we used to – or at least their parents do).

 

We were inserted and things were looking pretty comfortable until the first change bowler came on. He was a chatty kiwi who bowled pacey inswingers. Partha was pinned LBW and Gunny played on. He bowled 14 overs on the trot and got three of the top four out. Gordon tried to hold things together, but made little progress in the middle overs against steady bowling. He eventually out to a sucker punch, chipping the very slow bowler to the only fielder on the leg side. Sal and Kunjal looked comfortable for a while but when Sal was out we were 86-4 with more than half the overs used up. Kunjal is in good form and marshalled the tail well (except for running out Liam Patel on his debut!) to finish 45 n.o. Abhi provided some much needed impetus with a very quick 21, including an enormous six over the sand pit corner. We doubled our score in the last 13 overs.

 

So we had something to bowl at and were feeling good at 12-2, both to Abhishek. They had a good third wicket partnership which got them to 60, but then another two quick wickets fell and there was reason for optimism. One of these was hard hitting no. 4 who cleared the rope a few times. Shrey Parmar kept his nerve to bowl him. At 100-6 we thought we had a really good chance, but that evaporated quickly as the support bowling disappeared to all parts, partly due the chatty kiwi, who could bat as well as bowl. Abhi came back to get him for 51, but it was too late by then. Abhi finished with 5-38 but he needed more support from the rest of us.

 

Doug Gordon